Pediatric Advocacy Program

Resident Advocacy Projects


The following residents took part in the StAT program in which they collaborated with a community partner/organization. Their projects were designed to meet community needs and to explore their own interests in the realm of pediatric medicine.

Maya_Ragavan
Maya Ragavan (Class of 2014)
Health after surviving intimate partner violence: Women's and Adolescents’ Perspectives

Click here for more information on Maya's project. >>

Intimate partner violence (IPV) has several detrimental health effects on survivors and their children. However, there is little past research examining survivors’ perspectives regarding the health effects of IPV and what health interventions would best serve their family's needs. This is a three phase project including: 1) conducting a comprehensive needs assessment of women and children at a transitional housing center serving survivors of IPV, 2) developing and implementing a health education curriculum for families at the center, and 3) rigorously evaluating the curriculum to determine its efficacy.

Maya has worked with survivors of IPV in multiple capacities. Her incredible work in this area during her residency has resulted in several honors, two of which include receipt of the Community Access to Child Health (CATCH) Resident Research Grant Award in 2014 and the Resident Research award at the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) regional conference in 2015.

Maya’s research would not be possible without the support and partnership of HomeSafe. HomeSafe is a transitional housing center run by the organization Next Door Solutions to Domestic Violence in San Jose. It is run by a dynamic and dedicated team: Sarah Lucha (manager), Wanda Nallan (women's advocate), and Samantha Cedillo (children's advocate). They provide comprehensive services to the families and work on advancing self-sufficiency and independence.


   
Ashley McClary

Ashley McClary (Class of 2014)
School Readiness Friendly Clinic

Click here for more information on Ashley's project. >>

Being ready for school has been shown to be an important factor in a child's school success, which leads to improved graduation rates, less association with crime, and healthier lifestyles overall. Unfortunately, those in lower socioeconomic classes are at a disadvantage in terms of school readiness and many of these children are not identified until they have already entered kindergarten.

My project aims to study an intervention aimed at improving school readiness for low income, Spanish-speaking families. This intervention is designed to identify children at risk and give tools to overcome individual weaknesses. I will be conducting pre- and post-intervention surveys to assess the parent knowledge, utilization of community resources, and attitudes of school readiness before and after the implementation of this intervention.

As a future general pediatrician I see the impact school success has on individuals and families, particularly those with low income. I feel that it is our duty to help these children as it has been shown time and time again that school readiness ultimately impacts their health and happiness. However, I recognize that clinic visits are often time and resource limited. Therefore, I love the idea of a practical clinic based intervention to help close the gap on health disparities. Furthermore, I hope to gain valuable skills to use in my future career as a pediatrician-advocate.


   

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Michael
Michael Friedberg (Class of 2013)
Youth Gardening and Nutrition Initiative

Click here for more information on Michael's project. >>

Childhood obesity has more than tripled in the last three decades and disproportionately affects children in lower income communities. Additionally, there has been a growing concern that children facing food insecurity have poorer nutritional habits putting them at higher risk for obesity. We conducted an informal needs assessment with families, which identified the need for low cost, highly nutritious meals, using the materials that can be found in the local pantry, and quick to prepare. We conducted a literature review of community-based research from 2001-2012 identified 4 major points to focus a curriculum around for healthier food behaviors: consumption, perception, knowledge, and impact on home environment. Based on this information and an informal needs assessment with the community, a pilot curriculum of 6 summer classes was established to engage Middle School aged children and parents in the East Palo Alto community. The program engaged the community and partnered with the Ecumenical Hunger Program (EHP) in East Palo Alto, whom also agreed to host chefs from Stanford Dining to host the curriculum.



 
Emily_Johnston
Emily Johnston (Class of 2013)
Teen Pregnancy in Incarcerated Youth

Click here for more information on Emily's project. >>

Incarcerated youth are among the most disenfranchised youth. Within the juvenile justice system, the needs of the girls are often overlooked. The Santa Clara County Supervisors recently identified reducing teen pregnancy and STIs in court-involved girls as a top priority. To better understand the needs of incarcerated girls, interviews have been conducted to understand their attitudes about their health. These interviews revealed that the girls have difficulty accessing the medical system after leaving Juvenile Hall.

Therefore, we wanted to learn more about the barriers the girls face when accessing the reproductive healthcare system outside of Juvenile Hall. To do so, we developed a computerized survey about basic demographic information and sexual risk factors as well as a semi structured interview about the girls’ experience with the reproductive healthcare system. We then used complete capture to survey and interview the girls incarcerated at Santa Clara County Juvenile Hall over a 3 week period. We then transcribed and sanitized the interviews and are now analyzing our data.

The results will be presented to the academic community as well as the Santa Clara County. The County can then use the information we gather to create the most effective interventions to improve reproductive health in incarcerated adolescent girls.



 
lahia
Lahia Yemane(Class of 2013)
Needs Assessment of Eritrean Community in Santa Clara County

Click here for more information on Lahia's project. >>

Being a first generation Eritrean-American, I grew up witnessing the complexity of issues within the Eritrean community which span from refugee needs and healthcare access, youth issues (dealing with generation/cultural gaps with parents and cultural identity), and lack of knowledge about health-related issues in the US (healthcare access and utilization of resources). Being that Eritrea is one of the newest and smallest nations in the world, there is no literature related to the needs of the Eritrean Diaspora in the United States despite having a growing community abroad. Prior research has shown that “the increasing presence of distinct African immigrant groups highlights the importance of differentiating their health patterns and needs to facilitate the provision of culturally sensitive services” (Chaumba 2010). In working with the Eritrean Community Center of Santa Clara, I hope to empower the community to take an active role in their health by performing a needs assessment and asset map in order to identify specific health-related issues and partner with them as a pediatrician to increase knowledge related to those specified topics through education and linking with relevant resources within Santa Clara County.




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Aimee_Grace
Aimee Grace (Class of 2012)
Human Trafficking and Healthcare

Click here for more information on Aimee's project. >>

The goal of Human Trafficking and Healthcare is to increase awareness and action about human trafficking among health care professionals in California. Data suggests that 28% of trafficked victims come into contact with a health care provider at some point during captivity, but they are not recognized. We aim to change this! With our community partner, the San Jose Police Department, we are starting an education campaign in hospitals throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. Our intervention is a well-researched PowerPoint presentation entitled “Human Trafficking and Health Care.” We will be administering surveys pre- and post- presentation to determine health care professionals’ changes in attitudes, knowledge, skills, and behaviors. Our objectives include increasing awareness about human trafficking among over 1,000 health care professionals in California—enabling more victims to be recognized—and increasing action about potential human trafficking victims among health care professionals (i.e., calls to 911 or the National Human Trafficking Hotline; referral to a social worker or social service agency; or any other form of call for assistance). We then plan to analyze, summarize, and disseminate data with participation from SJPD.

5 For the Future: Here are five young people we think you will be hearing a lot about in the future. March 2010. Hawaii Business by Mark Brislin


   
Andrea_Estrada
Andrea Estrada (Class of 2012)
Health Needs of East Palo Alto Farmer's Market Attendees

Click here for more information on Andrea's project. >>

This project was mainly directed at the community of East Palo Alto, particularly the attendees of the East Palo Alto Farmers’ Market.  It aimed to identify the self-perceived health care needs of the East Palo Alto Farmers’ Market. By conducting a needs assessment, we were able to understand which health care topics the community of East Palo Alto was most interested in learning about.

Our partner was the YMCA. The information collected was intended to be used for structured monthly health care education and screening at the farmers’ market.  After the data was collected, the farmers’ market moved to the Ravenswood Family Health Center (RFHC). The data was presented to the staff in charge of the farmers’ market there as well.

 

 
Amna_Khan
Amna Khan, MD (Class of 2012)
Increasing Language Access in Pediatric Clinics

Click here for more information on Amna's project. >>

Coming soon ...


 
Liz_Enlow
Liz Enlow (Class of 2012)
Pasitos de Bebe: NICU to Home

Click here for more information on Liz Enlow's project. >>

Pasitos de Bebé: NICU to Home will create a bridge between the NICU to a medical home for underserved infants. Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC) serves a diverse population of underserved, low resource, low education patients who face significant barriers when navigating the health care system. A network of SCVMC clinics with multilingual staff is their medical home. Unfortunately the link between the NICU and these clinics is tenuous and with recent county budget cuts nearly non-existent, resulting in increases in Emergency Department utilization and avoidable rehospitalizations. Establishing a medical home is essential for improved clinical outcomes thus reducing health disparities through care coordination and support navigating complex systems. In bringing together the voices of parents and key stakeholders, Pasitos de Bebé will bridge the clinical and community gap by providing information to community physicians and a nurse home visit program currently under development.


 

 

Robyn_Rogers
Robyn Rogers (Class of 2012)
Implementation of Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment (ETAT) at a Mission Hospital in Rural Malawi
Click here for more information on Robyn's project. >>

The mortality rate for children in Malawi aged 0 to 5 years is 10-12%. Like many developing countries, key deficiencies are inadequate emergency and critical care services. To address this, the WHO developed a system called Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment, or ETAT. ETAT has been validated in multiple resource-constrained settings, including Malawi. St. Gabriel’s Hospital in impoverished rural Namitete is responsible for the medical care of approximately 250,000 people, with as many as 1200 pediatric admissions per month during the high season.

We performed a systematic examination of current triage efforts and assessed the medical infrastructure. We evaluated the previous year’s demographic, admission and mortality data. This assessment was used to design an appropriate, sustainable ETAT delivery system for St. Gabriel’s Hospital, which was then implemented. Implementation included training staff, modifying facility layout, improving patient flow, tracking data, developing leadership and ensuring sustainability. We initiated a multi-tiered fundraising effort to support these activities.


 
Liz_Barnert
Liz Barnert (Class of 2012)
Mindfulness training for incarcerated youth project

Click here for more information on Liz Barnert's project. >>

Through a partnership with The Mind Body Awareness Project (MBA), the aim of this community- based participatory research study is to perform an evaluation of a one-day intensive meditation and mindfulness-based training course delivered to incarcerated youth in San Mateo County, and ultimately to develop evidence-based methods of rehabilitation that promote the health and wellbeing of this vulnerable population. As demonstrated in countless studies on adolescent physical and mental health, incarcerated youth comprise a particularly vulnerable group who are at heightened risk for problems faced by the general adolescent population such as depression, substance dependence, and violence-related physical injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. By exploring the experiences of incarcerated young adults who receive this training in meditation and mindfulness techniques through a mixed methods community-based participatory research study, we hope to contribute to MBA’s efforts to enhance the emotional awareness and physical, psychological, and social wellbeing of incarcerated youth in San Mateo County.


 

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Allison
Allison Hill (Class of 2011)
Girls on the Run (Santa Clara County)

Click here for more information on Allison's project. >>

Childhood obesity is a significant problem in the U.S. Thousands of children in the bay area are on the path to the myriad of health problems caused by obesity. One quarter of local children are overweight. Many cannot meet fitness standards or participate in regular vigorous physical activity. We have partnered with Girls on the Run International (GOTRI), an annual 12-week after school running program that culminates in a 5K race. Thus far, it has had tremendous success among elementary school age girls. The local branch, Girls on the Run Silicon Valley (GOTRSV) now hopes to expand the program to local middle schools, where they would call the program Girls on Track. Burnett Academy, a middle school in San Jose, has been identified as an ideal pilot school to begin Girls on Track. The school district has a majority of Hispanic students, has many students who receive free or reduced cost school lunches, and has very few students who meet physical fitness standards. This grant would fund a pilot expansion to Burnett Academy in the 2009-2010 school year. Specifically, it would provide 50% of the girls with full scholarships to participate in Girls on Track, ensure the successful launch of a middle school program, and serve as a model site for other local middle schools. We plan to develop a survey tool for the program to evaluate the success of Girls on Track. With this small step, we are working to prevent childhood obesity in local populations.


 
Jason_Bacha
Jason Bacha (Class of 2011)
Increasing water access in public parks

Click here for more information on Jason's project. >>

Improving Drinking Water in our Parks: A Pilot Study aims to improve the health behaviors of at-risk inner city youth in San Francisco by improving the availability of potable drinking water and the physical environment at John McLaren Park, as well as through the development of educational sessions and materials. Working closely with Youth Tennis Advantage and San Francisco Recreation and Parks, we will conduct and analyze semi-structured in-person focus groups and interviews with students, caregivers/parents, and other key informants (e.g., Director of San Francisco Parks and Recreation, YTA coaches and staff, Neighborhood Council Representatives) to inform the development of a pilot program that encourages healthy beverage consumption among YTA participants, and helps to improve park conditions for patrons of John McLaren Park. 

This partnered research study will provide valuable information to enable the development of programs (e.g. provision of safe drinking water, educational sessions) that will encourage children and adolescents to drink water and other healthy beverages, as well as to be more physically active in local park settings. Such an intervention has the potential for impacting not only obesity and nutritional status, but child and adolescent oral health as well. In addition, we aim to gather valuable information about the attitudes of conditions and water provisions in public parks in San Francisco, which will prove valuable to San Francisco Recreation and Parks as they prioritize areas for future improvements that will promote clean drinking water availability, greater access to, and usage of the parks. We also believe this study will be a model and provide a blueprint for similar efforts at other parks around the Bay Area.


 
Meg_Itoh
Meg Itoh (Class of 2011)
Understanding the lives and health needs of refugee foster care youth in Santa Clara County

Click here for more information on Meg's project. >>

Through a partnership with Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County and its Refugee Foster Care Program, the aim of this project is to better understand the daily lives and health needs of unaccompanied refugee youth in the area, and to ultimately identify opportunities to promote health and wellbeing of this vulnerable population. As documented in existing studies of refugee youth, a subset of this population, the unaccompanied refugee minors, compromise a particularly vulnerable group who are at increased risk for problems faced by the general refugee population, such as depression, anxiety and post traumatic stress disorder. By exploring the challenges and triumphs of their resettlement experience through focus groups, we hope to identify unmet physical, psychological, social and educational needs of the refugee youth population in Santa Clara County. 


 
Laura_Carter
Laura Carter (Class of 2011)
Asthma Needs Assessment & Intervention in Homeless Shelters

Click here for more information on Laura's project. >>

Asthma Needs Assessment & Intervention in Homeless Shelters
Homelessness is a significant problem affecting families in the Bay Area. The homeless children in these families face unique health challenges. In particular, our local homeless population has identified asthma as an important issue. It is well described in the medical literature that improving asthma management requires a multi-factorial and systematic approach. Many such programs have been implemented in local clinics, schools, and daycare centers, but not in homeless shelters. We are proposing that the homeless shelter serves as an opportune location in which to identify children affected by asthma, provide education to staff, parents, and children, and optimize asthma management. This intervention will be done through the development of an asthma protocol in collaboration with our partners at the Shelter Network. This protocol will be developed with the support and expertise of our colleagues at Breathe California and the San Mateo Asthma Coalition who are already focused on improving asthma management throughout California. The goal of the protocol is to improve asthma care, through interventions such as increasing use of appropriate medications, improving asthma education, and minimizing environmental triggers. The specifics of the protocol will be based on the findings of focus groups with shelter residents and key informant interviews with shelter staff. A follow up assessment will be conducted to evaluate which aspects of the protocol were feasible for the shelter to implement. The results of this assessment will be shared with our community partner as well as disseminated among the medical community to improve knowledge about improving asthma management through homeless shelters.


 
Jon_Marron
Jon Marron (Class of 2011)
Conflict of Interest Resolution for Pediatrics
Click here for more information on Jon's project. >>

The project’s overall goal is to improve the management of conflicts of interest in pediatrics.  I will achieve this goal via the creation of a policy statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics regarding conflicts of interest in pediatrics.  This policy statement will, in turn, lead to an improved understanding of how conflicts of interest manifest in pediatrics and how best these conflicts should be managed.  Simultaneously, I will write a position piece regarding conflicts of interest in pediatrics for public dissemination to aid in the initiation of a public discourse on conflicts of interest in pediatrics and the importance of a strong policy regarding their management.


 
Sahar_Rooholamini
Sahar Rooholamini (Class of 2011)
Families First: Strengthening the Medical Home
Click here for more information on Sahar's project. >>

A core element of the medical home is “maintenance of an accessible, comprehensive, central record that contains all pertinent information about the child, preserving confidentiality.” The personal health record (PHR) is a simple but potentially powerful tool in transforming patients’ interactions with the health care system because it gives voice to the concerns that may not always be addressed during brief clinic visits. 

This planning project is based on community partnerships with Support for Families of Children with Disabilities (also known as Support for Families, part of the Family Voices of California coalition) and Parents Helping Parents, two local organizations that support and advocate for parents of CSHCN. We want to learn if and how families of CSHCN would like to use the PHR and the barriers they may face in accessing this tool. Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital (LPCH), located in Silicon Valley, has partnered with Google Health to create a PHR to facilitate better health care system interactions, promote self-management and give greater voice to patients’ and families’ concerns and needs. The long-term goal for this project is to create the foundation for a community-based program that facilitates access to the PHR and medical home. 


 
Kathy_Eng
Kathy Eng (Class of 2011)
Nutrition (WIC)
Click here for more information on Kathy's project. >>

Coming soon ...


 

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Rachel_Bensen
Rachel Bensen (Class of 2010)
Legislative Advocacy in Child Health (LACH)

Click here for more information on Rachel's project. >>

The LACH project aims to provide legislative advocacy updates and presentations during LPCH and Santa Clara Valley Grand Rounds, as a means of educating our colleagues about current important legislative issues relating to child health. The goal is to influence the culture of our institution by making education and activism about child health related legislative issues both easy and a part of routine educational programs for people at all levels of training. The presentations will also facilitate action by highlighting simple ways we as health care providers can take action to promote policies that are favorable for children’s health. 

 
Monica_Eneriz_Wiemer
Monica Eneriz Wiemer (Class of 2009)
Children’s Hospitals & Global Partnerships: Partnering with St. Gabriel’s Hospital, Malawi
Click here for more information on Monica's collaborative project. >>

Children’s Hospitals & Global Partnerships: Partnering with St. Gabriel’s Hospital, Malawi Children’s Hospitals and Global Partnerships aims to develop a sustainable partnership between Packard Children’s Hospital (LPCH) and St. Gabriel’s Hospital in Malawi. The project first evaluated the needs of St. Gabriel’s Hospital in pediatric care (including focus groups with clinical health workers, hospital staff and parents) during a two week visit by Dr. Eneriz-Weimer in 2007. Areas of need identified included neonatal resuscitation staff training and quality improvement efforts. A resuscitation program was developed and implemented by Dr. Olmstead in 2008. Dr. Olmstead is currently revising the curriculum and plans to do another training in 2009. Additionally, the project is developing a model program for a global health track for pediatric residents. Dr. Eneriz-Weimer is conducting interviews with pediatric global health training faculty at best practice institutions across the country. The findings from this project will be analyzed and will be currently being written up for manuscript submission.


 
Keely_Olmsted
Keely Olmsted (Class of 2010)
Children’s Hospitals & Global Partnerships: Partnering with St. Gabriel’s Hospital, Malawi

Click here for more information on Keely's collaborative project. >>

Children’s Hospitals & Global Partnerships: Partnering with St. Gabriel’s Hospital, Malawi Children’s Hospitals and Global Partnerships aims to develop a sustainable partnership between Packard Children’s Hospital (LPCH) and St. Gabriel’s Hospital in Malawi. The project first evaluated the needs of St. Gabriel’s Hospital in pediatric care (including focus groups with clinical health workers, hospital staff and parents) during a two week visit by Dr. Eneriz-Weimer in 2007. Areas of need identified included neonatal resuscitation staff training and quality improvement efforts. A resuscitation program was developed and implemented by Dr. Olmstead in 2008. Dr. Olmstead is currently revising the curriculum and plans to do another training in 2009. Additionally, the project is developing a model program for a global health track for pediatric residents. Dr. Eneriz-Weimer is conducting interviews with pediatric global health training faculty at best practice institutions across the country. The findings from this project will be analyzed and will be currently being written up for manuscript submission.


 
john_Peoples
John Peoples (Class of 2009)
Out of School Youth Outreach Project
Click here for more information on John's project. >>

The project’s main objective is to improve the independent health care skills of adolescent migrant farm workers who work in Gilroy (aged 15-21) by conducting focus groups to learn about adolescents’ health, social and educational needs. One need that arose from the focus groups was a lack of health supplies and information. The OSY project team developed and distributed Health Care Kits containing materials that address basic healthcare needs – pesticide exposure, wound care, heat stroke/dehydration, and STD prevention – as well as contact resources of local healthcare services. The findings from this project have been analyzed and are currently being written up for manuscript submission.


 

 

Arti_Desi
Arti Desai (Class of 2009)
Universal Children’s Health Coverage: Uniting Children’s Hospitals to Affect Change
Click here for more information on Arti Desai's project. >>

The project’s main objective is to increase legislative action among pediatricians and children’s hospitals to advocate for children. The project is designed to partner with community child advocacy groups in order to improve access to health coverage for children. A needs assessment of children’s hospitals was conducted to determine how to maximize resources, establish partnerships with child advocacy organizations, and participate in legislative action including letter writing campaigns, phone calls and meeting with legislators. The findings from this project have been analyzed and are currently being written up for manuscript submission.


 
MyMyBuu
MyMy Buu (Class of 2009)
Happy 5: Needs of Vietnamese Children

Click here for more information on MyMy Buu's project. >>

Happy 5 is a project designed to promote child development, health care utilization, safety and preventative health for preschool aged Vietnamese children in Santa Clara County. A needs assessment including focus groups was conducted to gather preliminary data for use by the community partner organization to define areas of need and program objectives. The second phase of the project includes engagement with the community partners and outreach via a media project with Vietnamese language radio and newspaper in order to bring health education and resource awareness to the linguistically isolated community. The findings from this project have been analyzed and are currently being written up for manuscript submission.


 
Mosquera
Maria Mosquera (Class of 2007)
Healthy Weight Healthy Futures Program: Partnering with Head Start in East Palo Alto
Click here for more information on Maria's collaborative project. >>

A collaboration between Head Start in East Palo Alto http://www.ihsdinc.org/our program/HeadstartF.htm and the Packard Children’s Hospital (LPCH) to facilitate the development of a parent designed, family-centered obesity prevention program for preschool aged children and parents. The program was designed to improve dietary and physical activity behaviors of Latino preschool age children and their families. Parents participated in a series of focus and working groups to examine strategies and barriers for promoting health dietary and physical activity behaviors, evaluate best practice models for obesity prevention, and develop a basic framework for a culturally appropriate and community-specific obesity prevention program for preschool aged children. Residents Mosquera and Iezza developed and tailored classes using existing curricula to meet parents' needs. The series of classes were given in 2007 and individual sessions are still used for parent classes in East Palo Alto.

School nutrition is activists' passion: How 4 dedicated people work to help Bay Area students eat right. August 28, 2006. San Francisco Chronicle, by Stacy Finz.

Fighting obesity through the power of parents. July 28, 2006. Palo Alto Weekly, by Alexandria Rocha.


 
Iezza

Heather Iezza (Class of 2007)

Healthy Weight Healthy Futures Program: Partnering with Head Start in East Palo Alto
Click here for more information on Heather's collaborative project. >>

A collaboration between Head Start in East Palo Alto http://www.ihsdinc.org/our program/HeadstartF.htm and the Packard Children’s Hospital (LPCH) to facilitate the development of a parent designed, family-centered obesity prevention program for preschool aged children and parents. The program was designed to improve dietary and physical activity behaviors of Latino preschool age children and their families. Parents participated in a series of focus and working groups to examine strategies and barriers for promoting health dietary and physical activity behaviors, evaluate best practice models for obesity prevention, and develop a basic framework for a culturally appropriate and community-specific obesity prevention program for preschool aged children. Residents Mosquera and Iezza developed and tailored classes using existing curricula to meet parents' needs. The series of classes were given in 2007 and individual sessions are still used for parent classes in East Palo Alto.

School nutrition is activists' passion: How 4 dedicated people work to help Bay Area students eat right. August 28, 2006. San Francisco Chronicle, by Stacy Finz.

Fighting obesity through the power of parents. July 28, 2006. Palo Alto Weekly, by Alexandria Rocha.


 
Anisha_Patel
Anisha Patel (Class of 2005)
Un Equilibrio San (A Healthy Balance)

Click here for more information on Anisha's project. >>

A collaboration with the Mayfair Improvement Initiative (Now Somos Mayfair) in San Jose, CA. Anisha began working with MII promatores to provide health education to neighborhood residents. Parents s identified pediatric obesity as a concern and Anisha set off to help parents reduce obesity in their community. Through a series of focus groups, parents identified the local school field as their top concern. The field was in need of repair to increase physical activity among school children, and to make it a place were the community can go to be active. With the support of the school principal, planning meetings were held at the school, letter writing campaings for funding were conducted, several mini-grants were submitted, and meetings with members from the School Board were held. Additionally, nutrition and physicial activity classes were held for parents, and several field days were held for children, with help from Stanford Medical Students and undergraduates. A grant for $15,000 was received from the Valley Foundation to support the field renovation and the School Board agreed to maintain the field.

Rich foods a big threat to poor kids. December 3, 2004. San Jose Mercury News.


 

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